Personal Trainer: Denise Horvilleur

Muscles and connective tissue work with, and not separate from, the brain. In order to train the entire human movement system, all components must be addressed: Muscular System, Skeletal System, Endocrine System, Nervous System

Muscles and connective tissue work with, and not separate from, the brain. In order to train the entire human movement system, all components must be addressed: Muscular System, Skeletal System, Endocrine System, Nervous System

Background

At 19 years old I was in a fatal car accident. Although fortunate to walk out of the hospital, I did so at 75 lbs with a scar from my sternum to my pubic bone. Abdominal surgery left me with scar tissue, not just on my skin, but in several major organs. Along with numerous internal injuries, I had a broken collar bone, a sprained wrist and several fractured vertebrae. I left the hospital unable to stand up tall with difficulty breathing.

With time, I regained a normal weight and came to appear to stand up right. I muscled through college and, with the help of my siblings, graduated. Willfully, I then went straight into teaching in public schools. As time progressed, I came to train and compete in marathons and triathlons until a hiatal hernia along with a knee injury stopped me. It wasn’t until I stopped being active that I realized how stressed and tense I had become.

Years of training in mindfulness, yoga and tai chi led me to understand the value of rest, both mental and physical. I have since developed an interest in physiology as it pertains to balancing the nervous system alongside the musculoskeletal system. My approach to personal training involves cross training techniques as offered by the National Association of Sports Medicine with yoga and tai chi influences.

Developing a balance of tension and flexibility, both mentally and physically, is key. Both serve to a degree: tension offers structure while flexibility offers the ability to move with the dynamic nature of the body and life. I believe that an effective personal trainer listens to clients and respects what the clients want without imposing his or her biases. After all, balance is relative and we are all deserving of the freedom to choose how to maintain the body we have.

I work best with clients who seek balanced health: both internal and external. I invite questions and view the trainer/ client relationship as a partnership.

I hold a current certification in Personal Training from the National Association of Sports Medicine (NASM).

Training Objectives

To offer clients a flexible, diversified workout routine that progresses slowly. In addition to physical health, clients will develop their attention, motivation and ability to focus. Yoga and Tai Chi breathing and movement patterns influence standardized Sports Medicine exercises in order to target internal health as well. Clients will learn about their bodies and how to adapt training so as to learn to train themselves.

Approach

Periodization model of individualized exercise plan, outlining: weekly, monthly and yearly goals. Each month trainer and client meet to review personal training plan and adjust, if needed. Approach toward exercise involves first feeling, then thinking, moving, and lastly relaxing.

Training Elements

Clients may choose which training elements to focus on. The following training elements are broken-down further into specific exercises taken from: Cross Training, Sports Medicine, Yoga, Tai Chi, and Mindfulness Meditation

Warm-Up: Waking the Organs, Moving the Blood, Opening the Joints, Self Myo-Fascial Release

Exercise: Breathing, Body Resistance Training, Mindful Walking, Mindful Running, Free Weights, Tai Chi Forms/ Conditioning Exercises, Yoga Forms/ Postures, Qi Gong Forms *focus on loosening and strengthening specific body parts for corrective training and balance

Cool-down: Meditation, Active Relaxation, Restorative Yoga Postures, Rest